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Centre for Global Studies

In Huron’s Centre for Global Studies students confront problems of global inequalities, explore forms of globalization at human scales, and analyse the concepts, ideas, and cultural work ordering of life in this world.  Students learn to critically locate themselves in global power relations and practical ways in which they may take responsibility for their positions of privilege.

Through interdisciplinary, critical, and collaborative studies, Centre for Global Studies courses and academic programs engage global problems in relation to community–level experiences.  They support students in specifically feminist, anti–racist, decolonial, and anti–oppressive programs of research.  And students train in methods of social research and analysis, applied skills, and theoretical criticism preparing them for success in a wide variety of graduate programs and professional schools.

Students in the Centre for Global Studies may pursue degree modules in the following six programs of study:

Alumni Stories

Rigorous interdisciplinary study in the Centre for Global Studies prepares students for graduate and professional study, and for careers defined by addressing complex challenges. Our graduates embark on post-grad journeys that require critical thinking, engaging respectfully with others, and strong communications skills. We are honoured to share some of their stories here.

  • Huron students are motivated by our Liberal Arts perspectives, and we're going to take them in different directions to create a better world.
    Annika Lui
    Venture for Canada Fellow
    Read more
HONORS SPECIALIZATION
SPECIALIZATION
MAJOR
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Globalization Studies

Globalization Studies modules engage students in critical analysis of the dominant forces of globalization—mobility, integration and change—from the vantage point of human life. In the core courses in the Globalization Studies streams, students learn to distinguish prevailing theories about how globalization works, learn about the social, environmental and political entailments of capitalism, and consider alternative social, political and economic formations. Supplementary courses explore the emergence of resistance movements, localized alternatives to globalization, the impacts of mass production and consumption, the place of community in a globalized world, and more.

Learn more about the following program offerings in Globalization Studies:

Global Development Studies

The degree modules offered in Global Development Studies examine ways in which our world is structured and functions around profound inequalities, particularly in terms of poverty. This stream of studies focuses on how deep material inequalities result in power imbalances and the formation of oppressive social, political, and economic ideas and practices presented as “development.” In learning how to critically analyse these inequalities and to conduct socially responsible research in community contexts, students in these modules will learn to collaborate effectively with grassroots efforts to challenge and overcome these injustices.

Learn more about the following program offerings in Global Development Studies:

Global Health Studies

The degree modules offered in Global Health Studies integrate studies in community health promotion within contexts of global development and phenomena of globalization.  This program gives focus to how the work of community health promotion is caught within contexts of global scale inequalities, particularly in terms of poverty, and global scale social interrelations that situate problems of community health within relations of power related to capitalism, resource extraction, global food economies, and impacts of global racism, sexism, coloniality, labour exploitation, and environmental degradation.  Students gain the benefit of collaborative educational experience, bringing studies from the Health Sciences, Geography, and Sociology together with courses and programming offered by the Centre for Global Studies.

Learn more about the following program offerings in Global Health Studies:

Global Culture Studies

The degree modules offered in Global Culture Studies examine how knowledge of the world and understandings of one another are shaped by cultures of representation and ideological formations.  Students gain deep training in interpreting and analysing discursive formations and critically examining cultural productions of power relations in the world.   They gain practice in analysing such marginalising and oppressive principles as patriarchy, citizenship, territory, civilization, sovereignty, and the global.  Students learn to identify and effectively confront racializing and racist constructions in global theories, the privileges of masculinity, ideologies of development, and human/nature dichotomies.  Through such work, they gain skills and understanding necessary to become responsible cultural agents in the world.

Learn more about the following program offerings in Global Culture Studies:

Global Gender Studies

The degree modules offered in Global Gender Studies focus on gender– and sex–based inequalities and formations in the world from specifically feminist and queer orientations in research, analysis, and theory.  Combining the strengths and supports for these studies in existing Centre for Global Studies courses with a range of courses offered by Western University’s Dept. of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, this program of study offers remarkably rich opportunities to understand how global development, globalization, and cultural constructs shape and order individual’s lives and the dynamics of societies in the world on registers of gender, sex, and sexual orientation.  Students gain especially strong study of problems in the mobilising of feminist theory, gender analysis, and studies in sexuality on global scales.

Learn more about the following program offerings in Global Gender Studies:

Global Rights Studies

The degree modules offered in Global Rights Studies provide students with unique, responsible, and timely approaches to the critical study and support of persons’ and peoples’ rights within a global context.  They are prepared in recognition of the fact that most universalist principles, laws, and approaches to protect rights, paradoxically and typically, are exclusionary in character.  These proposed modules resist the study of rights in a contained or determined sense, as is the case when conceived in the form of “human rights.”  From this position, these modules offer students opportunities to study how the rights of persons, particularly those of individuals and groups who experience marginalisation or exclusion in rights protection and respect for their rights claims, face contested politics of claiming and asserting autonomy, rights, and self–determination on world–wide bases.  It is a program of study into the inevitable struggle for the right to rights.

Learn more about the following program offerings in Global Rights Studies:

Professors

Academic programs offered by the Centre for Global Studies are directed and taught by faculty members with richly interdisciplinary academic training who develop and pursue research programs with fundamentally critical orientations.  Learning with Centre for Global Studies Professors, students enjoy strong mentorship in how they may effectively engage the world and gain insights into their social responsibilities on global scales.

  • I challenge students to aspire to rigorous, honest, and effective engagement with the complexity of life in a globally interconnected world.
    Wendy Russell, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Centre for Global Studies
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  • My teaching aims to model the methods and principles of critical inquiry, radical democracy, and social equality. I see learning as a collaborative process that emerges through careful and committed questioning, observation and dialogue.
    Katherine Lawless, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Centre for Global Studies
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  • I approach teaching as an opportunity to create conditions that foster collective forms of learning and celebrate anti-oppressive ways of knowing in a global context.
    Lucas Savino, PhD
    Associate Professor, Centre for Global Studies
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  • I approach teaching as the cultivation of events in which we may confront the responsibilities we have as knowers, embrace the value of dis- and re-orientations in our learning, and become highly skilled in ethical scholarly practices.
    Mark F. N. Franke, PhD
    Director & Professor, Centre for Global Studies
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Centre For Global Studies Department

Tenure-stream

Program sessional and per course instructors

Adjunct Faculty Members Appointed to the Centre for Global Studies

Master's Programs for Centre for Global Studies Graduates

MA Programs in Environmental Studies
MA Programs in Globalization
MA Programs in Social Justice Studies
MA Programs in Migration Studies
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Experiential Learning Courses for 2021/22

CGS 3201G - Think Global, Act Local: Local Responses to Food Insecurity

Through work with a partner organization, students will explore urban gardening as a response to the forces of globalizaiton, with a particular focus on food sovereignty, socio-ecological sustainability, and racial justice. In collaboration, we will develop, design, and deliver initiatives or projects that serve the needs of our partner organization.

More Information

CGS 3203G - Global Studies Participatory Project: Resurgence and Reconciliation in Indigenous Communities

This experiential course provides students with an opportunity to combine academic study with practical experience working with an organization affiliated with the Indigenous Leadership Circle. This year’s course theme is resurgence and reconciliation. Students are encouraged to critically reflect on these topics in relation to social determinants of Indigenous health.

More Information

CGS Courses

Below, you will find lists of the CGS courses offered last year and this current year, as well as lists of anticipated CGS course offerings for the next few years. As you will see, many of the core CGS courses are offered annually, but most of our problem-oriented and issues-related courses are offered on a rotation basis, every two years.

The Centre for Global Studies ensures that all courses that students will require in any of the degree modules offered in our six academic programs can be accessed within every two-year cycle. And students should plan their course selections each year with that in mind.

CGS courses offer many types of interdisciplinary and critically-oriented forms of study into how our lives are situated in the world and how are lives are fundamentally interrelated with the experiences, concerns, and interests of others near and far. Variously, our courses range from engagements with practical problems of global inequalities and development, the study of social demands of globalised labour, exchange, and migration, and the material conditions of living in the world, through to world-wide politics of decoloniality, gender, displacement, agriculture, and the ideologies and languages through which we represent the world to ourselves. Through courses engaged with these problems and themes, as well as core courses focused on rigorous studies into research ethics, collaborative, participatory, and anti-oppressive methodologies and critical theory, students will be substantially prepared for graduate studies across the social sciences and humanities and professional engagements via law, business, public administration, and social advocacy.

2022 - 2023 Courses

This is the anticipated course list and subject to change.

CGS 1021F – Introduction to Global Culture
CGS 1021G – Introduction to Global Culture
CGS 1022F – Introduction to Globalization
CGS 1022G – Introduction to Globalization
CGS 1023F – Introduction to Global Development
CGS 1023G – Introduction to Global Development
CGS 2002F/G – Problems of Global Development
CGS 2003F/G – Discourses of Global Studies
CGS 2004G/G – Critique of Capitalism
CGS 3001F/G – Collaborative and Participatory Methodologies
CGS 3005F/G – Theorising Subjectivity and Power
CGS 3006F – Critical and Anti–Oppressive Methodologies
CGS 3006G – Critical and Anti–Oppressive Methodologies
CGS 3201F/G – Think Global, Act Local
CGS 3203G – Global Studies Participatory Project
CGS 3512F/G – Engaging Global Human Displacement
CGS 3516F/G – Economies of Development
CGS 3518F/G – Non–State Peoples and State Formations
CGS 3519F/G – Global Inequalities Based on Sexual Differences
CGS 3520F/G – Overcoming Management Paradigms in Global Development
CGS 3524F/G – Postcolonial Global Studies
CGS 3525F/G – Community in Global Modernity
CGS 3521F/G – Non–State Spaces in Transition
CGS 3528F/G – Non–Hegemonic Food Economies
CGS 3529F/G – Global Governmentality
CGS 3530F/G – Ungovernable Life
CGS 40XXF/G – Honors Seminar (topic to be determined)
CGS 40XXF/G – Honors Seminar (topic to be determined)
CGS 40XXF/G – Honors Seminar (topic to be determined)
CGS 40XXF/G – Honors Seminar (topic to be determined)

2021 - 2022 Courses

The 1000-level courses offered in the Centre for Global Studies each provide rich and engaging introductions to relations, inequalities, systems, identities, and divisions around which the experiences of global life are currently formed and organized. They also introduce to students intellectual and methodological problems and issues that one must face in doing the interdisciplinary scholarly work of Global Studies.

Course Instructor Course Outline
CGS 1021F  – Introduction to Global Culture Lawless View course outline
CGS 1021G – Introduction to Global Culture Franke View course outline
CGS 1022F – Introduction to Globalization Russell View course outline
CGS 1022G – Introduction to Globalization TBA View course outline
CGS 1023F – Introduction to Global Development Llavaneras Blanco View course outline
CGS 1023G – Introduction to Global Development McBurney View course outline

Each stream of study is grounded in a 2000–level course in which students will engage specific global problems, issues, themes, and relations that will orient and prepare them well for advanced study in that particular stream.  Each of these foundation courses invites students to study ways in which key concerns in these respective streams of study are formed and how these formations challenge us as scholars.  Strong emphasis is placed in these courses on developing analytical skills and knowledge crucial to success within the specific stream of study in which they are required.

Course Instructor Course Outline
CGS 2002F – Problems of Global Development Gaudet View course outline
CGS 2003F – Discourses of Global Studies Franke View course outline
CGS 2004G – Critique of Capitalism Russell View course outline

These courses ensure that students are sufficiently versed in skills, problems, and ideas related to research and analysis in the respective streams of study so that they are well prepared for advanced and graduate study and vocations related to their specific fields of interest.

Course Instructor Course Outline
CGS 3001F – Collaborative & Participatory Methodologies Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3001G – Collaborative & Participatory Methodologies Lawless View course outline
CGS 3006G – Critical and Anti-Oppressive Methodologies Llavaneras Blanco View course outline
CGS 3201G – Think Global, Act Local Lawless View course outline
CGS 3203G – Global Studies Participatory Project Dakin View course outline
CGS 3509G – Indigenous Peoples and Global Dispossession Lawless View course outline
CGS 3513G – Non-Hegemonic Economic Forms and Global Capitalism Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3514F – Global Resistance Movements Russell View course outline
CGS 3515F – Global Cultures of Gendering and Orientation Dakin View course outline
CGS 3516F – Economies of Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 3517F – Decoloniality Dakin View course outline
CGS 3519G – Global Inequalities Based on Sexual Difference Llavaneras Blanco View course outline
CGS 3520G – Overcoming Management Paradigms in Global Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 3522F – Global Mobilities Lawless View course outline
CGS 3523F – Law in Global Relations and Language of Power Franke View course outline
CGS 3526G – Challenging Regimes of Global Citizenship & Internationalization Franke View course outline
CGS 3527G – Globalized Capitalist Agriculture Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3529F – Global Governmentality Papadatos View course outline
CGS 4013F – Honours Seminar: Place and Movement Llavaneras Blanco View course outline
CGS 4015G – Honours Seminar: Power and Resistance Russell View course outline
2020 - 2021 Courses
Course Instructor Course Outline
CGS 1021F  – Introduction to Global Culture Lawless View course outline
CGS 1021G – Introduction to Global Culture Franke View course outline
CGS 1022F – Introduction to Globalization Puppe View course outline
CGS 1022G – Introduction to Globalization Russell View course outline
CGS 1023F – Introduction to Global Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 1023G – Introduction to Global Development Savino View course outline
CGS 2002F – Problems of Global Development Savino View course outline
CGS 2003F – Discourses of Global Studies Franke View course outline
CGS 2004G – Critique of Capitalism Lawless View course outline
CGS 3001G – Collaborative & Participatory Methodologies Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3005G – Theorising Subjectivity and Power Lawless View course outline
CGS 3006F – Critical and Anti-Oppressive Methodologies Savino View course outline
CGS 3203G – Global Studies Participatory Project Savino View course outline
CGS 3512F – Engaging Global Human Displacement Franke View course outline
CGS 3516G – Economies of Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 3518G – Non-State Peoples and State Formations Savino View course outline
CGS 3519G – Global Inequalities Based on Sexual Difference Gaudet View course outline
CGS 3520G – Overcoming Management Paradigms in Global Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 3521G – Non-State Spaces in Transition Franke View course outline
CGS 3524F – Postcolonial Global Studies Puppe View course outline
CGS 3525F – Community in Global Modernity Lawless View course outline
CGS 3528G – Non-Hegemonic Food Economies Russell View course outline
CGS 3530F – Ungovernable Life Russell View course outline
CGS 3531F – Global Energy Regimes Dakin View course outline
CGS 4015F – Honours Seminar: Power and Resistance Russell View course outline
CGS 4016G – Honours Seminar: Globalization Lawless View course outline
2019 - 2020 Courses
Course Instructor Course Outline
CGS 1021F – Introduction to Global Culture Puppe View course outline
CGS 1021G – Introduction to Global Culture Franke View course outline
CGS 1022F – Introduction to Globalization Russell View course outline
CGS 1022G – Introduction to Globalization Shrimali View course outline
CGS 1023F – Introduction to Global Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 1023G – Introduction to Global Development Savino View course outline
CGS 2002F – Problems of Global Development Savino View course outline
CGS 2003F – Discourses of Global Studies Franke View course outline
CGS 2004G – Critique of Capitalism Lawless View course outline
CGS 3001F – Collaborative and Participatory Methodologies Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3001G – Collaborative and Participatory Methodologies Russell View course outline
CGS 3005G – Theorising Subjectivity and Power Lawless View course outline
CGS 3006F – Critical and Anti–Oppressive Methodologies Savino View course outline
CGS 3202G – Seminar in Global Studies:  Confronting Patriarchy in the Liberal Arts Lawless View course outline
CGS 3203G – Global Studies Participatory Project Savino View course outline
CGS 3509F – Indigenous People and Global Dipossession Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3513F – Non-Hegemonic Economic Forms and Global Capitalism Russell View course outline
CGS 3514G – Global Resistance Movements Russell View course outline
CGS 3515F – Global Cultures of Gendering Awâsis View course outline
CGS 3516F – Economics of Development Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3517G – Decoloniality Puppe View course outline
CGS 3519F –  Global Inequalities Based on Sexual Differences Gaudet View course outline
CGS 3520G – Overcoming Management Paradigms in Global Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 3522F – Global Mobilities Papadatos View course outline
CGS 3523G – Law in global relations and Languages of Power Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3526G – Challenging Regimes of global Citizenship and Internationalization Franke View course outline
CGS 3527G – Globalized Capitalist Agriculture Shrimali View course outline
CGS 4010F – Honors Seminar: Poverty Savino View course outline
CGS 4015G – Honors Seminar: Power and Resistance Russell View course outline
2018 - 2019 Courses
Course Instructor Course Outline
CGS 1021F – Introduction to Global Culture Lawless View course outline
CGS 1021G – Introduction to Global Culture Puppe View course outline
CGS 1022F – Introduction to Globalization Russell View course outline
CGS 1022G – Introduction to Globalization Savino View course outline
CGS 1023F – Introduction to Global Development Shrimal View course outline
CGS 1023G – Introduction to Global Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 2002F – Problems of Global Development Savino View course outline
CGS 2002G – Problems of Global Development Gaudet View course outline
CGS 2003G – Discourses of Global Studies Franke View course outline
CGS 2004F – Critique of Capitalism Russell View course outline
CGS 2004G – Critique of Capitalism Lawless View course outline
CGS 3001F – Collaborative & Participatory Research Methods Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3001G – Collaborative & Participatory Research Methods Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3006F – Critical & Anti-Oppressive Research Methods Savino View course outline
CGS 3203G – Global Studies Participatory Project Savino View course outline
CGS 3512F – Engaging in Global Human Displacement Franke View course outline
CGS 3516F – Economies of Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 3519G – Global Inequalities Based on Sexual Difference Gaudet View course outline
CGS 3520G – Overcoming Management Paradigms in Global Development McBurney View course outline
CGS 3521F – Non-State Spaces in Transition Franke View course outline
CGS 3525G – Community in Global Modernity Lawless View course outline
CGS 3527G – Globalized Capitalist Agriculture Shrimali View course outline
CGS 3529G – Global Governmentality Franke View course outline
CGS 3530F – Ungovernable Life Russell View course outline
CGS 3531F – Global Energy Regimes Lawless View course outline
CGS 4016F – Honors Seminar: Globalization Lawless View course outline
CGS 4018G – Honors Seminar: Post Colonial Critique Savino View course outline

Internships, Collaboration, and Solidarity Opportunities

Below are a list of resources and organizations for CGS students interested in opportunities to complement their global studies courses and interests.

Specialized Internships

Solidarity and Collaborative Programs

Careers

Graduates of the Centre for Global Studies are well prepared for rewarding careers and community engagement. Alumni have gone on to a wide range of pursuits, from development work abroad, to grassroots not-for-profits, to entrepreneurship. Our grads go on to things such as:

Where will a degree in Global Studies take you?
  • Interdisciplinary graduate school programs in: Global Development; Social, Political and Cultural Theory; International Affairs; Migration; Media & Film; Journalism
  • Disciplinary graduate school programs in: Anthropology; Economics; English; Geography; History; Linguistics
  • Law
  • Business school
  • Social entrepreneurship
  • Local, national and international Non-Governmental Organizations
  • International Development
  • Civil service
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Key Contacts

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